I came across an interesting discussion on linkedin discussing "heroic" LAs.  Now I'll stop short of calling them heroes but it revealed something I have been thinking about lately and hope to solve through the next year, my lack of knowing notable architects and more importantly, really knowing what they do/did.  So, here is a list derived from the LinkedIn post I hope to research and report back on this blog under the 'notable' category.  Would love your comments of names to add. 
  • George Hargreaves
  • Dan Kiley
  • Roberto Burle Marx
  • Andre Le Notre
  • Beatrix Farrand
  • Calvin Vaux
  • Pierre DuPont
  • Frederick Law Olmsted
  • Lawrence Halprin
  • Hideo Sasaki
  • James C. Rose 
  • Jane Jacobs
  • Ian McHarg
  • Kevin Lynch
  • Shodo Suzuki
  • Kathryn Gustafson
  • Peter Walker 
  • Louis Barragan
  • James Burnett
  • James Corner
  • Carl Steinitz
  • Jacques Wirtz
  • Leandro Silva
  • Jens Jensen
  • Theodore Osmundson
  • Thomas Church
  • Bob Perry
  • Martha Schwartz
 
 
Work from this past semester is now posted in my online portfolio. Check it out here.
 
 
Blake Conant and I worked on a promotion campaign for a future photovoltaic system on the UGA bookstore.  We were  charged to think of ways to engage the student public in solar energy and inform them of its campus potential. Here are some of the ideas we came up with for the campaign visuals.  
We also researched and proposed the use of a Lucid Dashboard system powered by existing Automated Logic metering.  This scalable system would highlight and bring transparency into the Campus energy use while offering strategies and accountability for energy savings. Our full report can be viewed below.
 

Journal

12/12/2011

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Self-perspective. We are challenged to perform in our jobs, in our marriages, friendships, academics, social circles and all the like.  So much is processed in a day that our mind have a hard enough time digesting summations, much less relaying details to be considered by the heart, mind and soul. A journal seems to be the landing point for all that is today but has value for tomorrow.  Looking back on even a normal day's journal entry offers perspective.  We can't remember it all and our reactions to events are often short-lived or easily distracted. Life is mayhem, a bunch of disconnected events that do infect correlate in a highly complex network of purpose.  Writing down events and responses might mean nothing to the current state of mind, but could be the defining factor for what lies ahead or what needs advice.  Daily perspective offers a roadmap to how I got to where I am and suggests roads to future decisions linked to wisdom.  These are my thoughts about nature.  May they inform and direct my future interactions with it.
 

Ethics

12/08/2011

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Sometimes this word gets thrown around with so much academic and haughty baggage is seems unethical to debate a word in such a way.  Can we define it as simple as "doing what is right, even when no one is looking." It might not hit on all that the word means but it gives a great place to start.  Sometimes I think we debate too much on what is ethical rather than just doing what is right.  We make too much of what is right and wrong with little regard to common sense.  Religion aside. Politics aside. In fact, put it all aside and determine whether your course of action will have a positive or negative effect on those involved, including the inanimate and unvoiced. Sometimes our delay in discussing ethics prevents ethical action. Maybe it is childish naivety that I will grow out of, but it seems more simple than scholars portray. I've probably said too much.
 

Grow

12/07/2011

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Maybe it is his own self, his own family, selling to a local restaurant but his livelihood and his own life are wrapped in the reality that animals are indeed "grown."  It might seem insensitive to put a living cow on the same level of a dusty potato. This farmer invests thousands in what will bring him thousands.  To me, it is a equal and respectable trade. Read more in Farm Life.
 
 
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The Interlocking Concrete Pavement Institute officially announced UGA's partnership in the development of an online curriculum to aid students and faculty in pavement options and implementation. Click here to read the official press release.

This is the website I have been working on alongside Doug Pardue (faculty advisor) and Stuart Jones (MLA 2012) through assistantship work.

 

Mull

12/03/2011

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I was driving home from this week's field trip when we noticed a classic small town letter sign.  It read something like, "Come to our world famous annual chicken mull, Saturday 9-4. $7 a plate." I'll be honest, I haven't the foggiest clue what a chicken mull is.  So I looked it up. Its a glossary right? Come to find out, Chicken mull really is famous and originated in Northern Georgia. From the New Georgia Encyclopedia (http://www.georgiaencyclopedia.org/nge/Article.jsp?id=h-3394), "The dish known in northeast Georgia as chicken mull is a stew of chicken meat (ground or cut into bite-sized or smaller pieces), broth, milk, butter, vegetables, and seasonings, thickened with crumbs of soda crackers. It is also called chicken stew, chicken soup (rarely), and in south Georgia, chicken jallop. Because grinding, cutting, and lengthy cooking can tenderize tough meat, chicken mull may have originated as a way to make tough old roosters and spent hens palatable." Looks like I might have to swing by the place to experience this Georgian delicacy.
 
 
Today I got the all-clear from the doctor to no longer wear a cast or brace for my wrist.  Free at last! I was giving my CT scan and watched it today.  Pretty amazing technology.  You can see the screw appear about half way through.
 
 
Enjoyed a field trip to a local Watkinsville farm. The greatest takeaway from the afternoon was the awesome twist of words that might offend some.  According to his words, the farmer "grows" turkeys or cows or chickens.  For me, this is a complete understood worldview.  The man works on a daily basis providing grass, water, vitamins, healthcare to those animals for the pure undivided purpose to feed!

Maybe it is his own self, his own family, selling to a local restaurant but his livelihood and his own life are wrapped in the reality that animals are indeed "grown."  It might seem insensitive to put a living cow on the same level of a dusty potato. This farmer invests thousands in what will bring him thousands.  To me, it is a equal and respectable trade.  A life for a life, sustenance for sustenance. His operation is the epitome of humane.  He provides opportunity for life to come onto his vegetated fields, and he determines the time for it to be removed.

In my own worldview, the creator always has the right to reclaim his creation.  With the power of creation, one is responsible to be a creator and not a killer.  Enter ethics. Enter sustainability. Enter purpose.